Review: Schreck’s ‘Constitution’ Means to Make Its Mark

By Paige Allen August 27, 2019 After seeing What the Constitution Means to Me, one thought was clear in my mind: This play should be required viewing for every single person in the United States of America.  Especially Congress. Heidi Schreck and her play cry out to be heard and heeded. You leave feeling simultaneously… Continue reading Review: Schreck’s ‘Constitution’ Means to Make Its Mark

Review: ‘Reborning’ Explores the Persistent Power of Trauma 

By Paige Allen August 27, 2019 Trauma is a tricky thing. It can rise up at times and in ways we least expect. Reborning explores how distressing experiences can leave scars on our bodies, hearts, and minds; how we can discover the depth of those wounds even years later; and how we cope with pain… Continue reading Review: ‘Reborning’ Explores the Persistent Power of Trauma 

Review: ‘Moscow’ Updates Chekhov, Makes Audiences LOL and Cry in the Club

By Paige Allen July 13, 2019 It’s a pretty safe bet to say that when most people think of the works of Anton Chekhov, they don’t immediately think “reality television.” Yet Halley Feiffer’s new play, Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow (yep, six Moscows: count them), often resembles an episode of Keeping Up with the… Continue reading Review: ‘Moscow’ Updates Chekhov, Makes Audiences LOL and Cry in the Club

Review: Expect the Unexpected in ‘Deathtrap’

By Paige Allen July 5, 2019 “Do you know, this could be a good thriller!” the young playwright exclaims before describing his exact situation: “A young playwright sends his first play to an older playwright who conducted a seminar that the young playwright has attended. Nobody else has read it, and then he comes to… Continue reading Review: Expect the Unexpected in ‘Deathtrap’

Review: In ‘[Veil Widow Conspiracy],’ Time and Truth are Changeable

By Paige Allen July 3, 2019 What do an urban dystopia, a murder mystery, and a documentary film have in common? About as much as Warlord Era Xinjang, a 2010 movie set, and Brooklyn in 2035. Yet in Gordon Dahlquist’s [Veil Widow Conspiracy], a new play developed and produced by the National Asian American Theatre… Continue reading Review: In ‘[Veil Widow Conspiracy],’ Time and Truth are Changeable

Review: Play On’s ‘The Tempest’ Aims to Please in Modern English

By Paige Allen July 1, 2019 Out of Shakespeare’s known plays, The Tempest is ranked among my favorites. I am only half joking when I say that I had a religious experience reading it for the first time, a spiritual awakening which led me to initiate myself into the cult of the English Department at… Continue reading Review: Play On’s ‘The Tempest’ Aims to Please in Modern English

Review: Hamill’s Adaptation is Not Like Other ‘Little Women’

By Paige Allen June 30, 2019 “I’ll never be a woman like you,” the “little woman” dressed in trousers with her hair cut short says to her mother. If Kate Hamill’s new adaptation of Little Women were personified, it would look like this, declaring emphatically to the previous generations of Little Women, “I’ll never be… Continue reading Review: Hamill’s Adaptation is Not Like Other ‘Little Women’

Review: A Reinvigorated ‘Mockingbird’ Brings Urgency to a Classic

By Paige Allen June 28, 2019 You could take Harper Lee’s classic novel To Kill a Mockingbird and perform it word-for-word, and it would make for a pleasant theatrical experience.  That is not at all what playwright Aaron Sorkin and director Bartlett Sher strive to create with their stage adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird… Continue reading Review: A Reinvigorated ‘Mockingbird’ Brings Urgency to a Classic

Review: In the Dark World of ‘INK,’ Hot Presses Mean High Stakes

By Paige Allen June 17, 2019 How far are you willing to go to win? James Graham is not the first playwright to explore this question. Yet, when placed at the heart of a true story about real people with the power to irrevocably change print journalism — all media, even — the question grips… Continue reading Review: In the Dark World of ‘INK,’ Hot Presses Mean High Stakes

Review: Mac’s ‘Gary’ Flawed but More Than Blood and Guts

By Paige Allen June 14, 2019 “I want to be a fool!” the clown exclaims. Because, he believes, only a fool can “change the world.” The dreams of a clown who yearns to be a fool propel Taylor Mac’s irreverent and audacious comedy Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus, playing through Sunday at the Booth… Continue reading Review: Mac’s ‘Gary’ Flawed but More Than Blood and Guts